Center for Computational Molecular Science and Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Center for Computational Molecular Science and Technology School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

CCMST Weekly News, June 24 2011

June 24, 2011 2:54 pm EDT

1. Statistics
2. Tip of the Week

STATISTICS

GGATE

Uptime: 6 days
/home directory usage: 28% (7.9 TB available)
/backup directory usage: 72%

Utilization for period from: 05/24/2011 to: 06/23/2011

Note: Full statistics for ggate are available online at: http://ggate.chemistry.gatech.edu:8080 (the link works only for the Gatech Chemistry network)

FGATE

Uptime: 18 days
/home directory usage: 61% (2.3 TB available)
/backups directory usage: 94%

LSF usage for Week 24 (6/13-6/19) (times are in minutes)
GroupJobsTotal CPUAvg CPUAvg WaitAvg Trnr.
Bredas 71 4510 0% 64 172 241
Hernandez 99 41115 2% 415 0 451
Sherrill 179 341475 18% 1908 1158 3781
Total 349 387100 20% 1109 629 2116

Note: percentages refer to the total CPU time available for the period.

Most productive user of the Week: kennedy 182634.

EGATE

Uptime: 109 days
/theoryfs/common directory usage: 58% (280 GB available)
/theoryfs/ccmst directory usage: 95% (50 GB available)

LSF usage for Week 24 (6/13-6/19) (times are in minutes)
GroupJobsTotal CPUAvg CPUAvg WaitAvg Trnr.
Hernandez 7283 478733 32% 66 38427 38495
Sherrill 18 70373 5% 3910 5134 9077
Other 517 21427 1% 41 23 79
Total 7818 570533 38% 73 35811 35887

Note: percentages refer to the total CPU time available for the period.

Most productive user of the Week: galen 478733.

TIP OF THE WEEK

By Massimo

Editing Remote Files in Vim

If you are like me, when editing files with vim you like working with just one local editing session, for instance using Gvim, keeping several buffers open with different files in order to easily exchange data between them, compare files and so on. What to do when one of the files you want to edit is on a remote server? Well, of course you can make a local copy of it, then manually copy over the modified version any time you need to test the changes you just made, but a more efficient way is to work directly on the remote file.

Vim supports the netrw plugin (it is a standard plugin for Vim version 6.0 or later) that allows you to edit remote files using standard protocols like scp, ftp, http, etc.

For instance, to edit a remote file using scp:

vim scp://remote.host.edu//home/user/work/input.dat

Note the use of double //. In this way any time you save a modification to the file, Vim automatically updates the remote version. To use this feature more efficiently, it helps if you setup a passwordless login to the remote host using the ssh key authentication, otherwise every time you save changes to the file you will have to manually enter the password for the remote server. If the remote file belongs to a different user, just specify the user name using the customary user@host ssh format:

vim scp://user@remote.host.edu//home/user/work/input.dat

If you are using Gvim, to open a remote file for editing enter the command:

:e scp://user@remote.host.edu//home/user/work/input.dat

Do you have usage tips that you want to share with the other CCMST users? Please send them to Massimo (massimo.malagoli@chemistry.gatech.edu) for inclusion in the Tip of the Week section.